Since you have completed the lesson, it’s your turn to test your knowledge of literary terms by answering the following multiple-choice questions.

Over my head the clouds thicken, then crack and split like a roar of cannonballs tumbling down a marble staircase; their bellies open—too late to run now!—and suddenly the rain comes down.

—Edward Abbey, Desert Solitaire


  1. What is the simile in this passage?

  2. “Over my head the clouds thicken”
    Try again.

    “crack and split like a roar of cannonballs tumbling down a marble staircase”
    Correct!

    “their bellies open—too late to run now!”
    Try again.

    “suddenly the rain comes down”
    Try again.


A noiseless, patient spider, I mark’d, where, on a little promontory, it stood, isolated;

—Walt Whitman, “A noiseless, patient spider”


  1. When Whitman indicates that the spider “stood” rather than “crawled” or “hung,” verbs commonly associated with spiders, what poetic device is he using?

  2. Blank verse
    Try again.

    Simile
    Try again.

    Personification
    Correct!

    Iambic pentameter
    Try again.


You lucky to be a spider.
Cause it’s bad luck to kill you.
Lucky to be a spider.
It’s bad luck to kill you.
But if you wasn’t a spider.
Your day would sure be through.

—Langston Hughes, “403 Blues”


  1. In the first stanza of “403 Blues,” Langston Hughes uses all of the following poetic devices except which one?

  2. Apostrophe
    Try again.

    Rhyme
    Try again.

    Repetition
    Try again.

    Simile
    Correct!


  1. When a sign at an elementary campus spells “School” as 
  2. “Shcool,” 
  3. what literary device comes to mind?

    Metaphor
    Try again.

    Irony
    Correct!

    Personification
    Try again.

    Conflict
    Try again.


  1. When the United States of America is called a “melting pot,” what literary device is being used?

  2. Personification
    Try again.

    Theme
    Try again.

    Metaphor
    Correct!

    Assonance
    Try again.